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Cheerleader claims discrimination by former employer

| Apr 19, 2018 | Workplace Discrimination |

Employers in Texas and throughout the nation must generally refrain from treating workers differently based on their religion, gender or other protected attributes. A former Miami Dolphins cheerleader claims that the team did treat her differently based on her religious beliefs. She also alleged that the cheerleaders were treated differently than the players in a variety of ways. The woman was a member of the team’s cheerleading squad for three years ending in 2017.

In a compliant filed with the Florida Commission on Human Relations, she claims that she was asked about a social media post featuring her being baptized. Furthermore, cheerleading team officials allegedly asked her to stop talking about the fact that she was a virgin. The woman’s lawyer is currently representing a former New Orleans Saints cheerleader who filed a similar complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

According to the former Dolphins cheerleader, she would have been less likely to pursue her claim had it not been for the one involving the Saints. The NFL said in a statement that all employees have the right to a workplace that is free from harassment in compliance with state and federal laws. The Dolphins said that they do not discriminate against employees based on their religious beliefs, race or gender.

Individuals who are asked to stop talking about their beliefs or to stop expressing their faith could be the victims of religious discrimination. If an employer terminates them after they fail to do so, it could be seen as an act of retaliation. Workers may be entitled to take action to either get their job back or obtain compensation for lost wages and the value of lost benefits.

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