Everybody wants to be paid fairly for doing a fair day’s work. We are learning, however, that the unfortunate truth is that equitable wages are far out of reach in many positions. Often times these less-than-fair discrepancies in pay run along gender lines.

A recent survey released by Gecko Hospitality has shed light on the salaries earned by individuals in the restaurant industry. This survey, the Restaurant Management Salary Survey Report, has been collecting and releasing data for 3 years. The report for 2017 shows dramatic wage gaps between male and female workers in positions ranging from hourly workers to directors of operations.

If you suspect that your employer has been paying you unfairly, withholding overtime pay or committing discrimination, do not hesitate to speak with a legal professional. They will analyze your situation and provide the legal support you need.

Pay gaps in hospitality industry

Gecko Hospitality’s survey took data from 601 female and 1488 male restaurant managers regarding employee pay. Across 10 positions surveyed, male employees averaged making a staggering $4,728 more than their female counterparts per year.

Of the 10 positions, male employees secured considerably higher salaries in all but one role, District/Multi-Unit Manager. The full salary comparisons are as follows:

  • Assistant Manager – Female salary: $46,746, male salary: $49,586
  • Catering/Sales/Events Manager – Female salary: $52,635, male salary: $61,589
  • Corporate – Female salary: $63,000, male salary: $78,546
  • Director of Operations – Female salary: $89,500, male salary: $78,546
  • Executive Chef – Female salary: $61,500, male salary: $66,647
  • General Manager – Female salary: $53,556, male salary: $61,354
  • Hourly – Female salary: $12,53, male salary: $13.29
  • Kitchen Manager – Female salary: $45,816, male salary: $52,430
  • Sous Chef – Female salary: $46,010, male salary: $53,727
  • District/Multi-Unit Manager – Female salary: $82,136, male salary: $65,600

President of Gecko Hospitality, Robert Krazak released a statement in which he asserted that, “This year’s data clearly shows that the pay discrepancy between men and women is still a prevalent issue within the industry. By using our survey results, employers can develop acquisition and retention strategies that attract top talent, while maintaining employee satisfaction.”

Achieving such a goal will require considerable effort, but with the right data and management it may be within reach.

Doing the same work as a colleague and making substantially less money is an understandably frustrating situation to find oneself in. No one should have to stand for unfair or discriminatory pay structures. Don’t wait to act if you feel your employer is doing this to you.